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Resource Round-up: Self Care

By OnYourMind Staff

Self-care can be such an important practice for looking after our physical, mental, and emotional health. It requires the ability to check in with ourselves and ask if we are getting what we need. If you are looking to expand your self-care practice, explore what kinds of self-care works for you, or just need a calming and centering activity, check out this resource round-up of self-care themed websites, apps, and books.  

Self-care is not inherently a selfish practice. When we aren’t used to setting time aside dedicated to taking care of ourselves, it can feel that way. This is especially true if in your self-care practice you are limiting your time or energy you would have given to others. Often, people can react negatively to this change, and can accuse you of selfish behavior. There are key differences between selfishness and self-care. Selfishness is centering every decision on your needs and desires without consideration for others. Self-care is listening your intuitive needs and meeting them in a way that does not come at another’s expense. 

Websites 

 Self Care Solitaire

Self Care Solitaire  is the idea of Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker Lauren of Starhaus Psychotherapy. She wanted to help provide people with concrete ideas for wellness through the self-care decks she sells, but the blog also contains lots of awesome self-care resources. 

You Feel Like Shit

You Feel Like Shit  is an online self-care game. It will take you through a series of questions that help you practice self-care in an easy and non-judgmental way. Creator Amanda Miklik based it on a Twine by Jace Harr and says on the site’s intro that “it’s designed to take as much of the weight off of you as possible, so each decision is very easy and doesn’t require much judgment.” 

Zen Habits 

Zen Habits  is a blog about “finding the simplicity and mindfulness in the daily chaos” of life. Check out articles on managing life’s stress using Zen and Buddhist principles.  

Apps 

Insight Timer

Insight Timer is the number 1 free meditation app. Guided meditations and talks led by the world’s top meditation and mindfulness experts, neuroscientists, psychologists and teachers from Stanford, Harvard, the University of Oxford and more. Music tracks from world-renowned artists. 

A top down view of someone sitting in bed with their legs crossed, holding a cup of tea. On the bed is an open book, a plate of toast, oatmeal, and a cup of walnuts.

Calm

Users of Calm can expect to experience better sleep, lower stress, and lessen anxiety with guided meditations, Sleep Stories, breathing programs, stretching exercises, and relaxing music. Calm is recommended by top psychologists, therapists, and mental health experts. Calm is the perfect mindfulness app for beginners, but also includes hundreds of programs for intermediate and advanced users. Guided meditation sessions are available in lengths of 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 25 minutes so you can choose the perfect length to fit with your schedule. 

Shine

Shine helps you treat yourself better and be kinder to yourself. After answering a few questions, you will receive a science-backed program focusing on an elements of self-care based on your goals. Self-care activities include gratefulness prompts, guided meditations, and access to the Shine community. 

Stop, Breathe, and Think

Stop, Breathe, and Think is a five-minute app that has you check in with how you are feeling and offers meditation and fun activities to help create space between your thoughts, emotions, and reactions. There is also a kid-friendly version that offers 15 missions to help kids find peace. 

#SelfCare

Several screenshot from the #SelfCare app, including an illustration of a bed, a notebook with some writing on it, and a game where you put letters into order to make a word.
Screenshots of the #SelfCare App

A little different from the rest, #SelfCare embraces you in the moment and offers activities that are less directive and more exploratory. A bubble expands and the screen lightens as you color it in or a screen where you fill in words that are positive thoughts. This is a great app for someone who wants less structure and a more whimsical, friendly approach. 

Books 

Self-Care for the Real World by Nadia Narain and Katia Narain Philips 

Jaqui Agate, Independent writer, says this book by sisters Nadia and Katia “is a deep dive into doing your best for yourself whatever your circumstances.” Read her review here. The book is divided into sections based around topics like “Self-care for social media,” and “What to do when you are heartbroken.” It combines advice, personal stories, lists, and exercises in a funny and friendly tone. 

The Little Book of Self-Care: The Tiny Everyday Habits that Will Transform Your Life by Mel Noakes 

Divided into three parts- Mind, Body, and Life- this book encourages readers to connect with themselves. Mel Noakes starts the book with a personal story of why self-care became such an important aspect of her life. Read a short review here

Speak Your Truth, Heal Your Heart: The Broken Girl’s Guide to Radical Self-Care by Christy Abram 

The cover of the book Speak Your Truth and Heal Your Heart: The Broken Girl's Guide to Radical Self-care, which has white text on a hot pink background.

Christy Abram is the founder of Brown Girls Write, a self-care movement with the goal of “helping girls of color reflect, heal, and thrive through self-expression.” This book is a powerful woven combination of narrative, advice, and tips on how to “let go of discomfort and fall in love” with yourself.  

It is so important to take time in our day to care for ourselves so that we can face the challenges of life. While self-care is a wonderful daily practice, sometimes we can become flooded in the moment. For quick coping techniques when you are feeling overwhelmed, check out our article on 20 Quick Coping Strategies for Anxiety. If you are struggling or need more support, you can always reach out to our teen chat (Mon-Thurs 4:30pm-9:00pm PST) or call our 24/7 crisis hotline at (1)650-759-0350. 

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